Edition #02 - Boogie Street – University of Copenhagen

Audiovisual Thinking

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Boogie Street by Thommy Eriksson, Chalmers University of Technology

A visual text critically reflecting on levels of intimacy and privacy raised by Google Street and adjacent technologies, and a meta-text reflecting on the incorporation of copyrighted media into academic discourse.


Considerations concerning copyright in the academic video essay Boogie Street

The content of this work is a critical reflection concerning Google Street and similar digital technologies and their intrusion into our private and intimate sphere. Since the video essay makes use of copyrighted material, it is used as an example of dealing with copyright issues for the Editorial Column of issue 2010#02 of the academic journal Audiovisual Thinking. The theme of this issue is rights and wrongs in the age of digital media. Thus, the video essay is a meta-text in the context of the journal, and this text is a meta-meta-text outlining the considerations undertaken concerning copyright issues.

There are two sets of copyrighted material in the video essay:

  • Images from Google Street View
  • Excerpts from the movies Blade Runner and Déjà vu

All other imagery is created by the author. All sound effects are taken from a royalty-free audio library. Quotations and citations from external sources are cited according to the conventional academic template for references. Note however the experimental Google reference at 00:00. What relevance does this form of referencing have in an academic context?

This video essay was produced in Sweden. According to Swedish copyright law (23 §), copyrighted public material may be used as a part of an academic exposition, as long as the intent is not commercial. Since the video is produced in an academic environment and with the intention of being critical and investigative, I claim that the context can be considered as academic. One condition is that the author of the copyrighted material is credited.

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