Issue #7 Open data – University of Copenhagen

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Where Next for Open Culture Data? by Lotte Belice Baltussen & Maarten Brinkerink

This video describes the project Open Culture Data that started as a grassroots movement in late 2011, with the aim to open up data in the cultural sector and stimulate (creative) reuse. In this context, the authors organised a hackathon, which resulted in the creation of 13 Open Culture Data apps. After this successful first half year, a solid network of cultural heritage professionals, copyright and open data experts and developers was formed. Currently, almost 40 datasets have been opened up, and as many apps have been developed. In this video, the authors share lessons-learned that will inform heritage institutions with real-life quantitative and qualitative experiences, best practices and guidelines from their peers for opening up data and the ways in which this data is reused. Since the open culture data field is still relatively young, this is highly relevant information needed to stimulate others to join the open data movement.

This video is based on the paper Open Culture Data: Opening GLAM Data Bottom-up, presented at the 2013 Museum and the Web conference.

Credits:

Lotte Belice Baltussen & Maarten Brinkerink, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision

Director, editor, audio: Sebastiaan ter Burg. Re-edit for Audiovisual Thinking: Harry van Biessum.

Open Culture Data is a joint initiative of Kennisland, Open State Foundation and the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision. In 2014, the network is supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science.

This video was produced by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Kennisland, as part of the large-scale digitisation project Images for the Future.

References:

Edson, M. (2010). Museums and the Commons: Helping makers get stuff done. Slideshare. Last updated December 16, 2010. Consulted January 24, 2013. http://www.slideshare.net/edsonm/museums-and-the-commons-helping-makers-get-stuff-done-6779050

European Commission. (2006). “Public Sector information – Raw data for new services and products.” Europe’s Information Society Thematic Portal. Last updated December 2012. Consulted January 5, 2013.

Kroes, N. (2011). “Foreword: Culture and Open Data: How Can Museums Get the Best from their Digital Assets?” Uncommon Culture: From Closed Doors to Open Gates, vol. 2, no. 1/2. Consulted December 10, 2012. http://www.firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/UC/article/view/3771/3053

Niggemann, E., J. De Decker, & M. Lévy. (2011). The new renaissance. Reflection group on bringing Europeʼs cultural heritage online. Brussels: European Commission. Consulted November 29, 2012. http://www.ace-film.eu/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/CdS_Final_report.pdf

Verwayen, H., M. Arnoldus, & P. B. Kaufman. (2011). “The problem of the yellow milkmaid. A business model perspective on open metadata.” Den Haag: Europeana. Consulted December 10, 2012. http://version1.europeana.eu/web/europeana-project/whitepapers/

Keywords:

Open data, creative reuse, Creative Commons



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